THE GOOD DEED – THE STORY OF A YOUNG BOY

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By Jo Rittey

 

The Good Deed is the story of an 11-year old Indigenous boy, Tyrone, and his Uncle Lucky. It is a snapshot of their lives in everyday urban Melbourne. The film is currently in pre-production by Space Between the Gaps Films and Mystical Guides Studios. The team behind this compelling story is about to launch a crowdfunding campaign through Pozible so they can green light the project and get it up on the big screen.

 

The short film, while potent in its own right, acts as a springboard to Fireboy, a feature length film that calls into question the slow death of a culture and the struggle of a young boy to survive. Broadly, Fireboy asks whether the government has a right to control indigenous Australians without a treaty. How can the Australian community save a new generation of First Nations’ children from the fate of their parents whose life expectancy is drastically shorter than the average Australian? These are volatile, provocative questions and the subject matter requires courage from both the filmmakers and the audience.

 

The short film, while potent in its own right, acts as a springboard to Fireboy, a feature length film that calls into question the slow death of a culture and the struggle of a young boy to survive.”

 

Directed by independent filmmaker, Eugene E-NRG, and co-written by Eugene with journalist Ray Edgar and Aboriginal community leader Robbie Thorpe (Elder Duran Bunjileenee), The Good Deed seeks insights to the above questions.

 

In The Good Deed, we meet Tyrone, a near delinquent runaway street kid who has been picked up by the police a number of times. On this occasion instead of delivering him once again to Social Services, the two rookie police officers decide to try something different and take him to his Uncle Lucky to see if he will take him in.

 

Tyrone is played by 12-year-old Kynan Brown from Preston. When Eugene talked to Robbie about possibilities for the role of Tyrone, Robbie suggested Kynan straightaway. It is easy to see why.

 

Kynan is no stranger to the limelight. He has been performing as a traditional dancer since he could walk. Taught by his father, he performs at least once a month in many festivals and community events. He has also been an extra on the television adaptation of ‘The Broken Shore’. He says he would like to do more acting and hopes that one day he might be in a film about super powers.

 

Kynan is the second youngest of five children in the Brown family. Born in Queensland, he was one when the family moved to Melbourne. I had a chat with Kynan in a café in Reservoir recently.

 

When asked what he likes about being Tyrone in the film, he says he likes the rehearsals. “There’s nothing to do on Sundays and there aren’t any buses so it’s good when Krusty (Eugene) comes and picks me up and we go to rehearsal.”

 

At school Kynan loves creating posters but he hates maths. He loves wrestling his dog, Mulka (‘shield’ in his native Indigenous language), a white staffy cross with black spots, and hanging out with his friends. Kynan likes riding his bike. He rides his bike everywhere with his friends, “even to South Melbourne and back” he boasts, then smiles cheekily saying, “Nah, I was just joking.”

 

When asked who he looks up to or who his heroes are, he replies, “My pop because he has lots of money.” Kynan would like lots of money because then he’d buy a “big as house and have heaps of cool as cars”. He’d go to the city, to Culture King, he says, and buy “heaps of clothes.”

 

Check out the Pozible campaign through the Facebook page facebook.com/thegooddeed and get on board.

 

 

 

Jo is a French teacher, has a PhD in Medieval French Literature and is caught up in the myth she can cram as much as possible into every day. You can read more on lyttelfishbigpond.blogspot.com.au

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